Sustainability Report 2017/18

GRI Content Index

 

GRI 100 Foundation 2016

GRI 102: General Disclosures 2016

 

 

Organizational profile

102 – 1 Name of the organization

 

dormakaba Holding AG

102 – 2 Activities, brands, products, and services

 

dormakaba is one of the top three companies in the global market for access and security solutions. dormakaba has divided the areas of business in which the company is globally active into five segments. Access Solutions (AS), which comprises four segments, is structured by region: AS AMER (North and South America), AS APAC (Asia-Pacific), AS DACH (Germany, Austria, and Switzerland) and AS EMEA (Europe, Middle East, and Africa). The offering includes the global product clusters Door Hardware, Entrance Systems, Electronic Access & Data, Interior Glass Systems, Lodging Systems, Mechanical Key Systems, Safe Locks and Services, as well as local products. The multifaceted portfolio ranges from door technology solutions, automatic door systems, a wide variety of fittings, door closers and stoppers, and locking systems – from cylinders, keys, and locks all the way up to fully networked electronic access solutions for companies, public facilities, hotels, and many other applications. The range also includes physical access systems, high-security locks, glass fittings, solutions for workforce management, as well as services for all these applications. The other globally focused segment is Key & Wall Solutions, with its two business units of Key Systems – which features a high-performance range of key blanks and mechanical, electronic and (semi-)industrial key-cutting and origination machines – and Movable Walls, specializing in partitioning systems. Alongside the dormakaba brand, the Group’s portfolio contains a number of other valuable brands for Access Solutions: e.g. Farpointe Data, Madinoz, Best; for Key Systems: Silca, Ilco, Advanced Diagnostics; for Movable Walls: Modernfold, Skyfold, Dorma Hüppe

102 – 3 Location of headquarters

 

Hofwisenstrasse 24 8153 Rümlang Switzerland

102 – 4 Location of operations

 

Sites Covered

102 – 5 Ownership and legal form

 

Corporate Governance

102 – 6 Markets served

 

Sites Covered

102 – 7 Scale of the organization

 

Sites Covered

 

Key Figures Financial Report

 

Facts and Figures – People

 

dormakaba offers a comprehensive portfolio of services in the area of secure access to buildings and rooms. The portfolio is structured into eight global product clusters: Door Hardware, Entrance Systems, Electronic Access & Data, Services, Mechanical Key Systems, Lodging Systems, Safe Locks and Interior Glass Systems. Moreover, there are local products for Access Solutions offered in the various regions. In addition to Access Solutions, dormakaba offers a comprehensive portfolio of products in the area of Key Systems (Keys, Key Cutting Machines, Automotive Solutions) and Movable Walls (Acoustical Movable Partitions, Vertical Sliding Walls, Horizontal Sliding Walls).

102 – 8 Information on employees and other workers

 

Facts and Figures – People

102 – 9 Supply chain

 

Our Supply Chain

102 – 10 Significant changes to the organization and its supply chain

 

In the 2017/18 financial year, dormakaba has combined its two smallest segments, Key Systems and Movable Walls, to form the Key & Walls Solutions segment with a joint leadership team. The individual businesses have not been merged operationally and continue to be run under separate brands. Further, we came to an agreement to divide existing shareholding in Dorset Kaba among the joint venture partners as per agreed terms, thus dissolving the joint venture that was initiated by former Kaba Group in 2007. Two divestments took place, one being the sale of our low-performing business Dorma Beschlagtechnik. This was followed in September 2017 by the sale of Chinese company GMT, due to the existing business portfolio and the prospects for profitability. Further adjustments to the business portfolio include two larger acquisitions. We acquired Australian company Kilargo in July 2017 to strengthen our market position in the Pacific region. In the same month, we acquired Skyfold, a Canadian producer of automated vertical partition wall systems that has a strong position in North America. As part of the post-merger integration activities, the relocation of standard door closer production from Ennepetal to Singapore has been accomplished in June 2018.

102 – 11 Precautionary Principle or approach

 

dormakaba adheres to the precautionary principle as the foundation of sustainability. Negative effects on the environment and health should be averted in advance to the greatest extent possible by all employees in all business activities. dormakaba sets this out in its Group-wide Code of Conduct.

102 – 12 External initiatives

 

United Nations Global Compact, United Nations Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights, ILO Minimum Age Convention, UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights, OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises, UK Modern Slavery Act 2015

102 – 13 Membership of associations

 

dormakaba is a member of various industry associations and organizations. The focus thereby lies on organizations concerned with door hardware, the security industry, building, locks and fittings, as well as metal and glass hardware, with memberships varying across countries and markets. These memberships include but are not limited to: Builders Hardware Manufacturers Association (USA), Swissmem (Switzerland), Association of Swiss Locks and Builders Hardware Manufacturers, European Locksmith Association, Security Industry Association (USA), The American Institute of Architects, United States Green Building Council, Door and Hardware Federation (UK), Singapore Manufacturing Federation, German Sustainable Building Council, Construction Specifiers Institute (USA), Glass association of North America, Canadian Security Association, American Association of Automatic Door Manufacturers, China Construction Metal Structure Association, Hong Kong Fire Protection Association, Japan Lock Manufacturer’s Association, Japan Security Systems Association, National Fire & Civil Emergency Preparedness Council (Singapore), Architectural Door Hardware Association (Australia).

Strategy

102 – 14 Statement from senior decision-maker

 

CEO Video Statement

Ethics and integrity

102 – 16 Values, principles, standards, and norms of behavior

 

Our Code of Conduct outlines our values, principles, standards and norms of behavior.

Governance

102 – 18 Governance structure

 

Board of Directors

Stakeholder engagement

102 – 40 List of stakeholder groups

 

About this report

102 – 41 Collective bargaining agreements

 

Facts and Figures – People (Type of Employment)

102 – 42 Identifying and selecting stakeholders

 

Stakeholder Dialogue

102 – 43 Approach to stakeholder engagement

 

Stakeholder Dialogue

 

Creating dialogue through a Group-wide employee survey

 

Supplier Assessment

102 – 44 Key topics and concerns raised

 

Supplier Assessment – Evaluation of the management approach

 

Creating dialogue through a Group-wide employee survey

Reporting practice

102 – 45 Entities included in the consolidated financial statements

 

Legal Structure

102 – 46 Defining report content and topic Boundaries

 

Materiality – Impact Assessment; dormakaba interactive Materiality Matrix 2017 – 2021

102 – 47 List of material topics

 

dormakaba interactive Materiality Matrix 2017 – 2021

102 – 48 Restatements of information

 

No such restatements

102 – 49 Changes in reporting

 

An additional 4 sites are reporting in the 2017/18 financial year.

 

The materiality reassessment has resulted in changes in material topics.

102 – 50 Reporting period

 

About this report

102 – 51 Date of most recent report

 

01.09.2017

102 – 52 Reporting cycle

 

Annual

102 – 53 Contact point for questions regarding the report

 

sustainability@dormakaba.com

102 – 54 Claims of reporting in accordance with the GRI Standards

 

This report has been prepared in accordance with the GRI Standards: Core option

102 – 55 GRI content index

 

GRI Content Index

102 – 56 External assurance

 

An external assurance for the Sustainability Report 2017/18 was not performed. The compensation to the Board of Directors and the Executive Committee as well as the financial statements were audited by an external auditor.

GRI 200 Economic

GRI Standard

 

Disclosure

 

 

Anti-corruption

 

GRI 103: Management Approach 2016

 

103 – 1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary

 

Materiality Matrix

 

103 – 2 The management approach and its components

 

Anti-corruption

 

103 – 3 Evaluation of the management approach

 

Anti-corruption

 

GRI 205: Anti-corruption 2016

 

205 – 3 Confirmed incidents of corruption and actions taken

 

There were no confirmed incidents of corruption in the 2017/18 financial year, including any related to employees or business partners. There have been no public legal cases regarding corruption brought against the organization or its employees during the reporting period.

Anti-competitive Behavior

 

GRI 103: Management Approach 2016

 

103 – 1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary

 

Materiality Matrix

 

103 – 2 The management approach and its components

 

Anti-competitive Behavior

 

103 – 3 Evaluation of the management approach

 

Anti-competitive Behavior

 

GRI 206: Anti-competitive Behavior 2016

 

206 – 1 Legal actions for anti-competitive behavior, anti-trust, and monopoly practices

 

There were no legal actions pending or completed for anti-competitive behavior, anti-trust and monopoly practices in the 2017/18 financial year.

GRI 300 Environment

GRI Standard

 

Disclosure

 

 

Materials

 

GRI 103: Management Approach 2016

 

103 – 1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary

 

Materiality Matrix

 

103 – 2 The management approach and its components

 

Materials

 

103 – 3 Evaluation of the management approach

 

Materials

 

GRI 301: Materials 2016

 

301 – 1 Materials used by weight or volume

 

Facts and figures – Environment

Energy

 

GRI 103: Management Approach 2016

 

103 – 1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary

 

Materiality Matrix

 

103 – 2 The management approach and its components

 

 

103 – 3 Evaluation of the management approach

 

Environmental Management – Evaluation of Approach

 

GRI 302: Energy 2016

 

302 – 1 Energy consumption within the organization

 

Facts and figures – Environment

Water

 

GRI 103: Management Approach 2016

 

103 – 1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary

 

Materiality Matrix

 

103 – 2 The management approach and its components

 

Water, Effluents and Waste

 

103 – 3 Evaluation of the management approach

 

Environmental Management – Evaluation of Approach

 

GRI 303: Water 2016

 

303 – 1 Water withdrawal by source

 

Facts and figures – Environment

Emissions

 

GRI 103: Management Approach 2016

 

103 – 1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary

 

Materiality Matrix

 

103 – 2 The management approach and its components

 

 

103 – 3 Evaluation of the management approach

 

Environmental Management – Evaluation of Approach

 

GRI 305: Emissions 2016

 

305 – 1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions

 

Facts and figures – Environment

 

305 – 2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions

 

Facts and figures – Environment

Effluents and Waste

 

GRI 103: Management Approach 2016

 

103 – 1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary

 

Materiality Matrix

 

103 – 2 The management approach and its components

 

Water, Effluents and Waste

 

103 – 3 Evaluation of the management approach

 

Environmental Management – Evaluation of Approach

 

GRI 306: Effluents and Waste 2016

 

306 – 2 Waste by type and disposal method

 

Facts and figures – Environment

Environmental Compliance

 

GRI 103: Management Approach 2016

 

103 – 1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary

 

Materiality Matrix

 

103 – 2 The management approach and its components

 

Environmental Compliance

 

103 – 3 Evaluation of the management approach

 

Environmental Management – Evaluation of Approach

 

GRI 307: Environmental Compliance 2016

 

307 – 1 Non-compliance with environmental laws and regulations

 

In the 2017/18 financial year, dormakaba was subject to CHF 6,215 in fines due to non-compliance with environmental laws and regulations pertaining to two locations. In one case this was due to administrative errors on the side of the company. In the other location, fines were imposed due to a wastewater spill after the site was hit by a typhoon. A new waste iron residue capture place was constructed, with a ditch diversion and a catchment for collecting any leaking oil in future. There is anti-seepage treatment on the ground. A further fine was given for operating a painting line without the required environmental impact assessment and environmental protection equipment. Since the incident, the issue has been corrected and the company has received qualified environmental impact assessment reports.

Supplier Environmental Assessment

 

GRI 103: Management Approach 2016

 

103 – 1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary

 

Materiality Matrix

 

103 – 2 The management approach and its components

 

Supplier Environmental Assessement

 

103 – 3 Evaluation of the management approach

 

Supplier Environmental Assessement

 

GRI 308: Supplier Environmental Assessment 2016

 

308 – 2 Negative environmental impacts in the supply chain and actions taken

 

10% of dormakaba’s procurement spend related to the sustainability target group was assessed for environmental impacts in the 2017/18 financial year. 16% were found to be unsatisfactory in their sustainability performance. These suppliers, for example, did not manage energy or water consumption nor maintained Environmental Management Systems. For none of these suppliers identified have there been improvements agreed upon as a result of assessment nor any contractual termination. A supplier development program is currently being developed.

GRI 400 Social

GRI Standard

 

Disclosure

 

 

Employment

 

GRI 103: Management Approach 2016

 

103 – 1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary

 

Materiality Matrix

 

103 – 2 The management approach and its components

 

Employment

 

103 – 3 Evaluation of the management approach

 

Employment

 

GRI 401: Employment 2016

 

401 – 1 New employee hires and employee turnover

 

Facts and Figures – People

Occupational Health and Safety

 

GRI 103: Management Approach 2016

 

103 – 1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary

 

Materiality Matrix

 

103 – 2 The management approach and its components

 

Occupational Health and Safety

 

103 – 3 Evaluation of the management approach

 

Occupational Health and Safety

 

GRI 403: Occupational Health and Safety 2016

 

403 – 2 Types of injury and rates of injury, occupational diseases, lost days, and absenteeism, and number of work-related fatalities

 

In financial year 2017/18, 260 occupational injury cases were registered (2.3 per 100 full-time employees), compared to 309 in the previous reporting year. Regionally, occupational injury cases were reported as followed: 13 in Switzerland (3.6), 59 in Germany (2.2), 44 in the rest of EMEA (2.2), 97 (3.6) in the Americas, and 47 (1.4) in Asia-Pacific. No fatalities as a result of work-related injuries in the financial year 2017/18.

Training and Education

 

GRI 103: Management Approach 2016

 

103 – 1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary

 

Materiality Matrix

 

103 – 2 The management approach and its components

 

Training and Education

 

103 – 3 Evaluation of the management approach

 

Training and Education

 

GRI 404: Training and Education 2016

 

404 – 1 Average hours of training per year per employee

 

Currently the approximately 11,000 dormakaba employees with computer access are able to participate in the dormakaba elearning platform. This represents 63% of the dormakaba employee base. Of these, 26% (2,807 employees) have completed at least one online module. The average training time of these employees is 1.7 hours. In the future, dormakaba will further promote the use of elearning and also consider access options for blue collar employees, e.g. dedicated rooms or multimedia terminals for online learning. Tracking of classroom training hours has taken place on a local level. For instance, the average training time per employee per year in the general sales workforce is 5 working days in India (AS APAC). In Suzhou, average classroom trainings for shop floor employees are 14 hours per year per employee. Office employees average 16 hours per year. The subsidiary TLHM Co. Ltd. in China North Asia shows training time as 13 hours per employee per year. Taishan employees have an average training time of 1.5 hours per employee per year. In the Pacific region, service technicians undergo between 8 and 12 hours of training per year, whereas sales representatives undergo between 4 and 16 hours training per year. Approximately 2 hours of training per employee per year and 24 hours of training per manager per year are offered in Swiss and Austrian sites. Belgium provided an average training time of 17 hours per employee in the 2017/18 financial year. In Italy, the Key Systems facility offers an average of 12 hours of training for every employee. In India, business unit Key Systems has an average annual training of 12 – 16 hours per employee (including apprentices and contractors). In the Modernfold facility, production supervisors receive approximately 16 hours of training per year. Office and management employees have at least 8 hours of training in class, on-the-job or e-learning. In the coming years, the coverage of this data will be improved.

Freedom of Association and Collective Bargaining

 

GRI 103: Management Approach 2016

 

103 – 1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary

 

Materiality Matrix

 

103 – 2 The management approach and its components

 

Freedom of Association and Collective Bargaining

 

103 – 3 Evaluation of the management approach

 

Freedom of Association and Collective Bargaining

 

GRI 407: Freedom of Association and Collective Bargaining 2016

 

407 – 1 Operations and suppliers in which the right to freedom of association and collective bargaining may be at risk

 

The sustainability impact assessment revealed China, Malaysia, the UAE and the USA as highest risk in the value chain and within operations.

Human Rights Assessment

 

GRI 103: Management Approach 2016

 

103 – 1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary

 

Materiality Matrix

 

103 – 2 The management approach and its components

 

Human Rights Assessment

 

103 – 3 Evaluation of the management approach

 

Human Rights Assessment

 

GRI 412: Human Rights Assessment 2016

 

412 – 1 Operations that have been subject to human rights reviews or impact assessments

 

An analysis of human rights risk countries, sectors and industries across the whole Group and the value chain was an integral part of the latest materiality assessment.

Supplier Social Assessment

 

GRI 103: Management Approach 2016

 

103 – 1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary

 

Materiality Matrix

 

103 – 2 The management approach and its components

 

Supplier Social Assessment

 

103 – 3 Evaluation of the management approach

 

Supplier Social Assessment

 

GRI 414: Supplier Social Assessment 2016

 

414 – 2 Negative social impacts in the supply chain and actions taken

 

10% of dormakaba’s procurement spend related to the sustainability target group was assessed for environmental impacts in the 2017/18 financial year. 16% were found to be unsatisfactory in their sustainability performance. These suppliers, for example, did not offer anonymous grievance mechanisms to their employees nor respect the right to freedom of association. For none of these suppliers identified have there been improvements agreed upon as a result of assessment nor any contractual termination, as supplier development programs are currently being developed.

Customer Health and Safety

 

GRI 103: Management Approach 2016

 

103 – 1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary

 

Materiality Matrix

 

103 – 2 The management approach and its components

 

Customer Health and Safety

 

103 – 3 Evaluation of the management approach

 

Customer Health and Safety

 

GRI 416: Customer Health and Safety 2016

 

416 – 2 Incidents of non-compliance concerning the health and safety impacts of products and services

 

There was one incident of non-compliance resulting in a warning letter from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in the USA. The product in question was a legacy product from a recent acquisition to dormakaba, which had been certified for Europe but not the USA. Corrective actions were implemented immediately. In addition, all products related to the acquisition were revisited, tested and certified to show compliance to the FCC. There were no further incidents reported.

Customer Privacy

 

GRI 103: Management Approach 2016

 

103 – 1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary

 

Materiality Matrix

 

103 – 2 The management approach and its components

 

Customer Privacy

 

103 – 3 Evaluation of the management approach

 

Customer Privacy

 

GRI 418: Customer Privacy 2016

 

418 – 1 Substantiated complaints concerning breaches of customer privacy and losses of customer data

 

There have been no reported incidents nor substantiated complaints concerning breached of customer privacy or losses of customer data within the 2017/18 financial year.

Customer Health & Safety
 

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